if you liked this, read this

Do you ever finish an amazing story and think “I wish there were more books like this?” If you’re anything like me, you also love to find connections between novels. Today, I pulled from my 2021 and 2022 reads to create a thread of recommendations based on the standout elements of each novel!

Do you ever finish an amazing story and think “I wish there were more books like this?” If you’re anything like me, you also love to find connections between novels. Today, I pulled from my 2021 and 2022 reads to create a thread of recommendations based on the standout elements of each novel!

This is a long thread, so I’m hoping you can find a book you’ve read on here and then keep coming back for your next pick when you’re finished!

If you liked Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversations by Mira Jacob for its graphic novel memoir elements and exploration of motherhood, read The Best We Could Do by Thi Bui.

If you liked The Best We Could Do by Thi Bui for the beautiful illustrations that cross space and time, read The Magic Fish by Trung Le Nguyen.

If you liked The Magic Fish by Trung Le Nguyen for its coming-of-age plot and cute gay romance, read Heartstopper by Alice Oseman.

If you liked Heartstopper by Alice Oseman for its wholesome illustration style, read Stargazing by Jen Wang.

If you liked Stargazing by Jen Wang for its strong friendships, read Class Act by Jerry Craft.

If you liked Class Act by Jerry Craft for the elements of found family and self-discovery, read Darius the Great is Not Okay by Adib Khorram.

If you liked Darius the Great is Not Okay by Adib Khorram for the bonding between grandkid and grandparents, read I Love You So Mochi by Sarah Kuhn.

If you liked I Love You So Mochi by Sarah Kuhn for its protagonist discovering her passion and figuring out her future, read Honey Girl by Morgan Rogers.

If you liked Honey Girl by Morgan Rogers for the sweet sapphic romance and goofy friendships, read One Last Stop by Casey McQuiston.

If you liked One Last Stop by Casey McQuiston for the New York City setting, read Severance by Ling Ma.

If you liked Severance by Ling Ma for the new adult figuring herself out, read Yolk by Mary H.K. Choi.

If you liked Yolk by Mary H.K. Choi for the young woman navigating a family member’s sickness, read Crying in H Mart by Michelle Zauner.

If you liked Crying in H Mart by Michelle Zauner for the dive into dealing with a mother’s death, read Memorial Drive: A Daughter’s Memoir by Natasha Trethewey.

If you liked Memorial Drive: A Daughter’s Memoir by Natasha Trethewey for the recounting of growing up through a framework of a mother-child relationship, read Heavy: An American Memoir by Kiese Laymon.

If you liked Heavy: An American Memoir by Kiese Laymon for the exploration of complicated mother-child relationships, read Speak, Okinawa: A Memoir by Elizabeth Miki Brina.

If you liked Speak, Okinawa: A Memoir by Elizabeth Miki Brina for its focus on biraciality, read Win Me Something by Kyle Lucia Wu.

If you liked Win Me Something by Kyle Lucia Wu for its quiet but impactful story, read Clues to the Universe by Christina Li.

If you liked Clues to the Universe by Christina Li for the characters who pursue their dreams, read The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo.

If you liked The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo for its spoken word verse, read The Black Flamingo by Dean Atta.

If you liked The Black Flamingo by Dean Atta for the journey of self-acceptance and self-discovery, read Felix Ever After by Kacen Callender.

If you liked Felix Ever After by Kacen Callender for how it brings a city to life, read Our Violent Ends by Chloe Gong.

If you liked Our Violent Ends by Chloe Gong for its beautiful prose, read The Chosen and the Beautiful by Nghi Vo.

If you liked The Chosen and the Beautiful by Nghi Vo for its dark and historical elements, read How Much of These Hills Is Gold by C Pam Zhang.

If you liked How Much of These Hills Is Gold by C Pam Zhang for its use of language and physicality, read Bestiary by K-Ming Chang.

If you liked Bestiary by K-Ming Chang for its centering of girlhood and bodies, read Sour Heart by Jenny Zhang.

If you liked Sour Heart by Jenny Zhang for its multiple perspectives, read There There by Tommy Orange.

If you liked There There by Tommy Orange for its interconnected characters and community, read Afterparties by Anthony Veasna So.

If you liked Afterparties by Anthony Veasna So for its often ironic and humorous voice, read How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia by Mohsin Hamid.

If you liked How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia by Mohsin Hamid for its interesting form and narrator, read The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen.

If you liked The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen for its telling of historical events through a time-bending structure, read Against the Loveless World by Susan Abulhawa.

If you liked Against the Loveless World by Susan Abulhawa for long span of historical fiction, read Pachinko by Min Jin Lee.

If you liked Pachinko by Min Jin Lee for the way it follows a family across generations, read The Mountains Sing by Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai.

If you liked The Mountains Sing by Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai for its focus on land and loss of land, read Island of Shattered Dreams by Chantal T. Spitz.

If you liked Island of Shattered Dreams by Chantal T. Spitz for its lyricality, read If They Come for Us by Fatimah Asghar.

If you liked If They Come for Us by Fatimah Asghar for the poetry that ties together heritage and history with self-identity, read Night Sky with Exit Wounds by Ocean Vuong.

If you liked Night Sky with Exit Wounds by Ocean Vuong for being in verse, read The Crossover by Kwame Alexander.

If you liked The Crossover by Kwame Alexander for the protagonist pursuing his dreams, read XOXO by Axie Oh.

If you liked XOXO by Axie Oh for the K-Pop elements, read I’ll Be the One by Lyla Lee.

If you liked I’ll Be the One by Lyla Lee for its protagonist who loves to perform, read On the Come Up by Angie Thomas.

If you liked On the Come Up by Angie Thomas for the young adult seeking to make her goals reality, read With the Fire on High by Elizabeth Acevedo.

If you liked With the Fire on High by Elizabeth Acevedo for the protagonist who loves to cook, read Natalie Tan’s Book of Luck and Fortune by Roselle Lim.

If you liked Natalie Tan’s Book of Luck and Fortune by Roselle Lim for its tantalizing food descriptions, read Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors by Sonali Dev.

If you liked Pride, Prejudice, and Other Flavors by Sonali Dev for its Austen-inspired plot, read A Taste for Love by Jennifer Yen.

If you liked A Taste for Love by Jennifer Yen for its delicious recipes, read Arsenic and Adobo by Mia P. Manansala.

If you liked Arsenic and Adobo by Mia P. Manansala for its humorous murder mystery, read Dial A for Aunties by Jesse Q. Suntanto.

If you liked Dial A for Aunties by Jesse Q. Suntanto for the interfering family members, read Dating Makes Perfect by Pintip Dunn.

If you liked Dating Makes Perfect by Pintip Dunn for the forced dating, read Rent a Boyfriend by Gloria Chao.

If you liked Rent a Boyfriend by Gloria Chao for the fake-dating, read Hani and Ishu’s Guide to Fake Dating by Adiba Jaigirdar.

If you liked Hani and Ishu’s Guide to Fake Dating by Adiba Jaigirdar for its protagonists who have opposite personalities, read Counting Down with You by Tashie Bhuiyan.

If you liked Counting Down with You by Tashie Bhuiyan for the protagonists who butt heads, read Made in Korea by Sarah Suk.

If you liked Made in Korea by Sarah Suk for the rival entrepreneurs-turned-lovers romance, read A Pho Love Story by Loan Le.

If you liked A Pho Love Story by Loan Le for the forbidden romance, read Not Here to Be Liked by Michelle Quach.

If you liked Not Here to Be Liked by Michelle Quach for the protagonists forced to team up, read The Way You Make Me Feel by Maurene Goo.

If you liked The Way You Make Me Feel by Maurene Goo for its featuring of a small business, read The Stationery Shop by Marjan Kamali.

If you liked The Stationery Shop by Marjan Kamali for its reunion of lovers after a long period of time, read Mó Dào Zǔ Shī by Mò Xiāng Tóng Xiù.

If you liked Mó Dào Zǔ Shī by Mò Xiāng Tóng Xiù for the xiānxiá fantasy, read Jade Fire Gold by June C.L. Tan.

If you liked Jade Fire Gold by June C.L. Tan for the desert settings, read She Who Became the Sun by Shelley Parker-Chan.

If you liked She Who Became the Sun by Shelley Parker-Chan for its dark themes and dive into gender, read The Vegetarian by Han Kang.

If you liked The Vegetarian by Han Kang for its commentary on womanhood, read The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan.

If you liked The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan for the mother-daughter relationships, read Beloved by Toni Morrison.

If you liked Beloved by Toni Morrison for the way it portrays a parent’s love, read Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates.

If you liked Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates for its theme and structure, read the work it responds to, The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin.

If you liked The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin for its discussions on race and religion, read All About Love: New Visions by bell hooks.

If you liked All About Love: New Visions by bell hooks for its focus on the radical role of love, read The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the Twenty-First Century by Grace Lee Boggs with Scott Kurashige.

If you liked The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the Twenty-First Century by Grace Lee Boggs with Scott Kurashige for its teachings on how we should go forth in our interactions with each other and the Earth, read Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer.

If you liked Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer for how it shows the relationship between land and people, read We Are Water Protectors by Carole Lindstrom and illustrated by Michaela Goade.

If you liked We Are Water Protectors by Carole Lindstrom and illustrated by Michaela Goade for how it portrays the important role of women, read Nervous Conditions by Tsitsi Dangarembga.

If you liked Nervous Conditions by Tsitsi Dangarembga for the protagonist who is transplanted to an environment with many class and cultural differences, read Mansfield Park by Jane Austen.

If you liked Mansfield Park by Jane Austen for its humor and English setting, read My Oxford Year by Julia Whelan.

If you liked My Oxford Year by Julia Whelan for its integration of literary and historical allusions, read Dictee by Theresa Hak Kyung Cha.

If you liked Dictee by Theresa Hak Kyung Cha for its unique form, read The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli.

If you liked The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli for how meta it is, read Interior Chinatown by Charles Yu.

If you liked Interior Chinatown by Charles Yu for how it depicts leaving home and family, read Goodbye, Again: Essays, Reflections, and Illustrations by Jonny Sun.

If you liked Goodbye, Again: Essays, Reflections, and Illustrations by Jonny Sun for its personal narrative essays, read Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning by Cathy Park Hong.

If you liked Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning by Cathy Park Hong for how it explores Asian American identity and experiences, read The Making of Asian America: A History by Erika Lee.

If you liked The Making of Asian America: A History by Erika Lee for the inclusion of history from many different places and time periods, read Jade City by Fonda Lee.

If you liked Jade City by Fonda Lee for the Asian-inspired setting, read A Wish in the Dark by Christina Soontornvat.

If you liked A Wish in the Dark by Christina Soontornvat for the kidlit fantasy, read Rea and the Blood of the Nectar by Payal Doshi.

If you liked Rea and the Blood of the Nectar by Payal Doshi for the protagonist’s adventure trying to bring her brother home, read Six Crimson Cranes by Elizabeth Lim.

If you liked Six Crimson Cranes by Elizabeth Lim for the protagonist experiencing new places and people, read Lady Susan by Jane Austen.

If you liked Lady Susan by Jane Austen for its epistolary form, read Dear Martin by Nic Stone.

If you liked Dear Martin by Nic Stone for the young characters trying to figure out their place in the world and their experiences as people of color in America, read We Are Not Free by Traci Chee.

If you liked We Are Not Free by Traci Chee for its honest depiction of the United States’ incarceration of Japanese Americans, read Citizen 13660 by Miné Okubo.

If you liked Citizen 13660 by Miné Okubo for its impactful black-and-white illustrations, read Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi.

If you liked Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi for being a powerful memoir, read Know My Name by Chanel Miller.

If you liked Know My Name by Chanel Miller for the journey of growth, healing, and self-identity, read Naturally Tan by Tan France.

If you liked Naturally Tan by Tan France for the look into a celebrity’s life, read Dear Girls: Intimate Tales, Untold Secrets, & Advice for Living Your Best Life by Ali Wong.

If you liked Dear Girls: Intimate Tales, Untold Secrets, & Advice for Living Your Best Life by Ali Wong for its humor, read Sex and Vanity by Kevin Kwan.

If you liked Sex and Vanity by Kevin Kwan for its satirical look at class and wealth differences, read The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga.

If you liked The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga for its darkness and suspenseful moments, read Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen.

If you liked Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen for the sibling ties and shenanigans, read It All Comes Back to You by Farah Naz Rishi.

I hope this post helps you find some new books to read! Please let me know if you make your own thread like this, too. I’d love to check it out!

Have you read any of these books, and what would you recommend if you were the one making this list?

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Author: april | lostinthebookstacks

hello! i'm april (she/her), an asian american reader who’s passionate about words and scallion pancakes.

3 thoughts on “if you liked this, read this”

  1. Wow this was so clever. I loved a few books on here like Dear Girls by Ali Wong. I added a few on here to my TBR like Speak, Okinawa: A Memoir. Thank you ❤️😊

    Like

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